ADT

ADT With and Without Xtandi in Men with Metastatic Hormone Sensitive Prostate Cancer: The ARCHES Trial

After a median follow-up of 14.4 months, the men who had Xtandi along with ADT experienced an improved radiographic progression-free survival advantage over those who had only ADT, regardless of their prior treatment. 

Short Term ADT with Radiotherapy As Salvage Treatment After Surgery: Update at 9 years of the GETUG-AFU 16 phase III Randomized Trial 

Findings confirm the better strategy for salvage therapy after failed surgery for prostate cancer is ADT along with radiotherapy,

The ENZAMET Study: Adding Enzalutamide to ADT in Metastatic Hormone-Sensitive Prostate Cancer Extends Survival

The trial found that 80% of men with metastatic hormone-sensitiveprostate cancer who received enzalutamide (Xtandi) along with standard-of-care treatment (ADT) were alive after three years, compared with just 72% of men who received other nonsteroidal antiandrogens along with standard ADT therapy.

The Synergy between Xtandi and Zytiga with ADT – Is it Important to Continue Taking ADT Along with Xtandi and Zytiga?

Why are Zytiga and Xtandi added to ADT and not substituted for ADT? Do I really need to continue ADT when I use Xtandi or Zytiga?

Degarelix Might Be Superior to Leuprolide in Minimizing Cardiovascular Disease and Incidents in Men with Prostate Cancer

We know that the incidence of both cardiovascular disease (CVD) and prostate cancer increase with age, resulting in higher mortality. CVD is the second most common cause of death in men with prostate cancer [1,2] Hormone therapy (ADT) with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists like Lupron for treatment of prostate cancer has been linked to additional increases in CVD morbidity and mortality. This link is especially evident in the first year of treatment [3], and men with a history of CVD are at higher risk [3].

Degarelix, which is different from the (GnRH) agonists, is a GnRH receptor antagonist also approved for the treatment of men with advanced prostate cancer. However, good data is suggesting that degarelix might have a lower incidence of causing CVD than the GnRH agonists

Does Hormone Therapy (ADT) Work?

Through the work of Huggins et al. [1] in 1941, it was shown that metastatic prostate cancer responds positively to an orchiectomy (surgical castration). We now know that there isn’t any other therapy which produces a more reliable regression of both distant and local disease than androgen withdrawal (ADT). 

What is the Correct Treatment Protocol if you Develop Lymph Node Metastasis after Surgery?

Having positive lymph node metastasis (LNM or pN1) after a radical prostatectomy (RP) to treat prostate cancer is a poor prognostic indicator.  Knowing what the next best course of treatment is if you are in this situation remains questionable.  To begin to understand and better answer this problem a group of researchers performed a comparative analysis of three of the current management strategies for men with positive lymph nodes after RP.

Hormone Therapy Negatively Impacts African American Men

A study found that African American men had a higher rate of death from non-prostate cancer problems than non-African American men after receiving short-term hormone therapy (ADT) prior to having brachytherapy (seeds).  There are significant implications beyond this research for African Americans using ADT for any purpose, including he treatment of advanced (progressive) prostate cancer.

Two Studies Released At ASCO Demonstrate A Survival Advantage For Men Who Take Early Zytiga With ADT

Two game changing trials demonstrated that the early use of Zytiga along with hormone therapy (ADT) can provide a significant survival advantage for men with aggressive, hormone naive prostate cancer.  The data is very clear for men with metastatic disease, but there remains some controversy if this holds up for men who are not metastatic.